Nimiipuu Nurtures Emerging Environmental Leaders

When the Nimiipuu launched the canoe they’d built on the Snake River in 2017, it was the first tribal canoe on their ancestral waters in 113 years. More widely known as the Nez Perce Tribe of Lapwai, Idaho, the Nimiipuu have long been active stewards of their traditional homelands, working to protect the health of the environment by sponsoring educational summits and workshops, partnering with other environmental organizations, and advocating for the removal of the four lower Snake River dams. Building and launching a tribal canoe was a natural continuation of this mission, entwined with the vision of a free-flowing river and access to traditional lands for fishing, hunting and gathering food, according to Julian Matthews, coordinator for Nimiipuu Protecting

Grant Partner Spotlight: Marlene R. Simla

Checking in with Yakama Tribal elder, MARLENE R. SIMLA At Potlatch Fund, the hard realities of the pandemic remind us of how important it is to support our culture keepers, many of whom are elders, not only with funding but also with care and attention. We decided to check in with a few of our elder grant partners, to see how they’re doing during the pandemic. While we are well aware of the ongoing challenges of COVID-19, we also pause to acknowledge with deep respect the resiliency of our Native relatives. We are pleased to introduce respected storyteller and elder Marlene R. Simla (Yakama) of Toppenish, Washington. Marlene is an enrolled member of the Yakama Nation, born and raised on

Meet James Jaime – Potlatch Fund Grant Recipient.

Quileute Language Preservation Project  James Jaime has a passion for preserving the Quileute language. He grew up in La Push, Washington, and watched over the years as the number of fluent Quileute language speakers decreased from 2,000 to just one, while at the same time the tribe’s population more than doubled. With help, James began cataloging and indexing materials and resources. And although the Quileute language is now considered “extinct” by some, James isn’t going to let it die. With help from Potlatch Fund, he participated in a Language Cohort with 14 other members, an experience he says gave him the energy and hope to persevere in his quest. Today, James and his team have produced four out of six

Meet Celeste Whitewolf – Potlatch Fund Grant Recipient

Núun ken’ witnéewit – Our Way of Weaving. Using natural materials gathered from the land.  Celeste Whitewolf practiced law for 20 years until a diagnosis of breast cancer changed the direction of her life. Since then, she’s founded an organization to help other Native people and their caregivers thrive through cancer, and seven years ago she decided to become a weaver. Celeste’s journey embodies the spirit of generosity and reciprocity we celebrate here at Potlatch Fund. Join us for our 18th Annual Gala on November 7 to support Native Artists like Celeste in her journey to preserve and renew the traditional Native art of weaving through her project “Núun ken’ witnéewit – Our Way of Weaving.” REGISTER FOR THE 2020

Book Launch Event and Special Celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

A Conversation About Indigenous Identity & Solidarity Today A Book Launch Event and Special Celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day Presented by: Potlatch Fund and Culture Story Moderated by: Brian Tanner, Potlatch Fund – Director of Philanthropic Partnerships Date: Monday October 12, 2020 Time: 3pm PST – 4pm PST The event is free to the community, no pre-registration required. You can let us know you’re attending and join the event at: Event Link: https://www.facebook.com/events/edit/657941051774385 The community is invited to a book launch event and a special celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day on Monday, October 12, when author Alyssa London will be joined by illustrator Monica Ricker-Bolter, Northwest formline artist Preston Singletary, and Debra Yepa-Pappan, Community Engagement Coordinator at Field Museum to